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Welcome to CogniFit! Welcome to CogniFit Research!

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You are going to create a patient management account. This account is designed to give your patients access to CogniFit evaluations and training.

You are going to create a research account. This account is specially designed to help researchers with their studies in the cognitive areas.

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You are going to create a family account. This account is designed to give your family members access to CogniFit evaluations and training.

You are going to create a personal account. This type of account is specially designed to help you evaluate and train your cognitive skills.

You are going to create a patient management account. This account is designed to give your patients access to CogniFit evaluations and training.

You are going to create a family account. This account is designed to give your family members access to CogniFit evaluations and training.

You are going to create a research account. This account is specially designed to help researchers with their studies in the cognitive areas.

You are going to create a student management account. This account is designed to give your students access to CogniFit evaluations and training.

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Clinical Trials

Reducing risk in clinical trials with more reliable results.

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Clinical trial evaluations of drug efficacy and safety are particularly challenging when dealing with the Central Nervous System. Success hinges on having smart trial designs, highly sensitive tests that measure what they need to know about your candidate's effects in a timely manner (and not later), reliable results so you can make decisions based on accurate data.

CogniFit's portfolio of cognitive assessments, training programs and designs help optimize trial outcomes by providing sensitive rapid reliable data quality insights for researchers. Our tools guide teams towards successful clinical trials with smart design principles that enhance candidate selection processes as well as study monitoring abilities.

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Get support at every stage of your study development

Cognitive Assessment Battery (CAB)® PRO

CogniFit digital cognitive tests are used to assess cognition in hundreds of studies worldwide. Each CogniFit test provides rapid, reliable, highly sensitive and valid measurement of distinct cognitive functions. Tests are culture-neutralavailable in 18 languages, designed for repeated administration, and ideal for use in clinical trials.

Scientific Consulting

CogniFit's team of neuropsychologists advise and guide the selection and execution of cognitive measurements for trials across all indications and phases of development. Talk with our experts on topics such as protocol design, test selection, and much more.

Clinical Outcome Data

Fast, flexible and proven, CogniFit’s electronic clinical outcome assessment (eCOA) platform delivers real-time data, and helps researchers to deliver insights through best-in-class technology and patient experience.

Custom Cognitive Assessment Protocols

CogniFit lets researchers create custom cognitive assessment protocols designed for their patients and needs. The researcher can choose which assessments and screening tools to include and the order in which to administer them. CogniFit conventional and proprietary digital cognitive assessments are designed for remote administration. Our science and operational teams are here to assist.

Measurement and analysis instruments for cognitive function

Research tools designed to help explore neuropsychological and cognitive characteristics in people with and without pathologies.

Computerized tools for scientists and researchers with simple scales, assessments, and valid standardized tests for children 7+ and adults.

Cognitive Assessment Battery (CAB)® PRO

Dyslexia Cognitive Assessment Dyscalculia Cognitive Assessment ADHD Cognitive Assessment Parkinson's Disease Cognitive Assessment Depression Cognitive Assessment Chemo Brain Cognitive Assessment Insomnia Cognitive AssessmentFibromyalgia Cognitive Assessment

311 institutions are currently running their studies with us.
If you are interested in conducting clinical research with any of our products please contact us

Our Digital Cognitive Assessments

CogniFit digital tests are designed to measure a specific areas of cognition and are grouped together to form customized batteries based on the unique requirements of the study design and population. Learn more about our different tests and how they can support the unique needs of your study by exploring the details and demos below.

The Rectangle Speed Exploration Test REST-HECOOR

The Speed Test REST-HECOOR exercise was inspired by the classic test of Fingertip tapping from the assessment battery NEPSY (Korkman et al., 1998). The test-taker is required to keep on clicking for 10 seconds and as rapidly as possible with the mouse, or finger if using a touch-screen device, in a defined area on the screen. Data is collected as the number of clicks during the allocated time, number of clicks inside the defined area and number of clicks outside it.

Circles and Hexagons Resolution Test REST-SPER

The Resolution Test REST-SPER was inspired by the classic paradigms Go/No Go Task (Gordon & Caramazza, 1982), Continuous Performance Test (Conners, 1989; Epstein et al., 2001), and the Psychomotor Vigilance Task (Dinges & Powell, 1985). The test-taker is required to rapidly press on circles which appear on the screen and to ignore hexagons should they also appear. Embedded in the task are 16 circles-only items and 8 circles-and-hexagons items. For each item data is collected on response time, response accuracy and cursor distance from target center.

Numbers and Shapes Processing Test REST-INH

The Processing Test REST-INH was inspired by the classic Stroop test (Stroop, 1935). The test-taker is required to press on the larger of two circles, regardless of the number inscribed in each circle, while ignoring the text that could appear on the top-middle part of the screen. They are then required to press on the higher number regardless of the size of the circle in which the number is inscribed.

The Numbers Sequencing Test WOM-ASM

The Sequencing Test WOM-ASM is based on the classic direct and indirect digit test of the WAIS-III (Wechsler, 1997). The test-taker is required to remember and reproduce increasingly longer number sequences, which appear, each in its turn, on the screen. The task will begin with a two- -number sequence.

Musical Notes Estimation Test EST-II

The Estimation Test EST-II is based on the Duration Pattern Test (DPT) (Frota & Pereira, 2003). The test-taker is asked to interrupt an ongoing auditory stimulus so as to reproduce the exact length of time of the previously presented one. In the first part of the task an animated drawing accompanies the stimulus. During the second part of the task, the drawing remains still.

Follow the Ball Synchronization Test UPDA-SHIF

The Synchronization Test UPDA-SHIF is based on the Vienna Test System (VST) (Whiteside, 2002). In this task the test-taker is required to carefully and precisely track a ball which moves along a path. The distance in pixels between the center of the ball and the cursor moved by the user is considered to calculate the accuracy score.

The Mazes Programming Test VIPER-PLAN

The Programming Test VIPER-PLAN took as a reference the classic Porteus Maze Test (Porteus, 1950), and the Route finding (NEPSY) (Korkman et al., 1998). The test-taker is presented with several mazes with dead-ends and is required to successfully go through it, from start to end, in the smallest possible number of steps, and as fast as possible.

Three Shapes Recognition Test WOM-REST

The Recognition Test WOM-REST is based on the classic tests of Symbol search (WAIS) (Wechsler, 1997), Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) (Heaton, 1981) and Raven's Progressive Matrices Test (Raven, 1936). In this task, a trio-sequence of objects is presented in the center of the screen. The test-taker is required to memorize these stimuli in a first screen, and to recognize it from among four trio-sequences in a second screen. The number of correct answers is considered to calculate an accuracy percentage.

Colors and Words Equivalencies Test INH-REST

The Equivalencies Test INH-REST was based on the classic Stroop test (Stroop, 1935). The test-taker is asked to press on the spacebar (go action) only if the color names on the screen are printed in the matching color and to refrain from pressing (no-go) if the color of the letters does not match the printed color name.

The Ball Coordination Test HECOOR

The Coordination Test HECOOR was inspired by the classic Trail Making Test (Reitan, 1955), and by the Vienna Test System (Whiteside, 2002). The test-taker is required to track, with the mouse (or on-screen digital joystick, if using a mobile device), a ball moving in an undetermined itinerary.

Glowing Circles Concentration Test VISMEM-PLAN

The Concentration Test VISMEM-PLAN took as a reference the Corsi block-tapping test (Corsi, 1972; Kessels et al., 2000; Wechsler, 1945). In the first part of the task, some circles, within a fixed array of circles, light up. The test-taker is required to memorize which circles, within the array, have lit up and then try to reproduce the sequence in the right order. In the second part of the task, a delay of 4 secs is added between the first screen and the playback screen, in order to increase the time the user must retain the information.

The Letters Decoding Test VIPER-NAM

The Decoding Test VIPER-NAM was inspired by the Boston Naming Test (Kaplan et al., 1983) and by the vocabulary test from the WAIS-III (Wechsler, 1997). The test-taker is required to click on the first letter, among four of them, that spells the name of the object depicted on the screen. For example, for the picture of an apple, the test-taker should click on the letter “A” but not on the three incorrect responses (C, P, M) also present on the screen.

Objects Seen or Heard Before Identification Test COM-NAM

The Identification Test COM-NAM is based on the Boston Naming Test (Kaplan et al., 1983) and by the vocabulary test from the WAIS-III (Wechsler, 1997). For each object shown, the test-taker must choose from three possibilities: 1) the item is presented for the first time in the task or 2) the last time it appeared the item was spoken or 3) the last time it appeared the item was presented as a picture.

Pictures and Words Inquiry Test REST-COM

The Inquiry Test REST-COM took as a reference the classic Boston Naming Test (Kaplan et al., 1983), the vocabulary test from WAIS-III (Wechsler, 1997), the Test of Variables of Attention (Greenberg et al., 1996), and the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (Schmidt, 1994). A series of objects are shown. In a new series of objects, the test-taker must then recognize only those objects that were previously displayed. This new series could be presented as images or as spoken words.

Fast and Curious Estimation Test EST-I

The Estimation Test EST-I was inspired by the Biber Cognitive Estimation Test (Goldstein et al., 1996). In the first part, the test-taker is required to determine which of two balls moves faster. In the second part, another ball is added. In the third part, a fourth ball is added and it should be indicated which ball moves twice as fast as a designated ball (the red one). In the fourth part, while watching four balls moving in four separate itineraries, the test- -taker must determine as quickly as possible which ball will arrive at a given point first.

Perspectives and Distances Estimation Test EST-III

The Estimation Test EST- III is based on the Biber Cognitive Estimation Test (Goldstein et al., 1996). The first part consists of indicating which of the objects on the screen is farther away from the user. The second part consists of indicating which of the objects is farther away from a pink ball, also located on the screen. The third part consists of indicating which two objects are at the same distance from the pink ball. The fourth part consists of indicating which object is not at the same distance from the pink ball. Finally, the fifth part is to indicate which of the images has the objects spatially arranged differently from the model.

The Ball and the Colors Simultaneity Test DIAT-SHIF

The Simultaneity Test DIAT-SHIF stems from the classic Stroop test (Stroop, 1935), the Vienna Test System (Whiteside, 2002), and the Test of Variables of Attention (Greenberg et al., 1996). The test-taker is required to accurately follow a ball moving and turning in all directions on the screen while, at the same time, performing a variant of the Stroop test.

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