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CogniFit has more than 2 million users worldwide

Cognitive Training for People with Depression

Trains and strengthens essential cognitive abilities in an optimal and professional way. Comprehensive report of results, progress, and evolution.

Who is it for?

This product is not for sale. This product is for research purposes only. For more info see CogniFit Research Platform

Multi-platform

Cognitive Training for People with Depression

Users under 16 years-old must use a family account

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Users under 16 years-old must use a family account

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Number of family members
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Number of participants
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Enter the desired number of patients and their months of training. Please note that the patient's subscription will begin at the time the patient registers. You may replace one patient with another if necessary.

Enter the desired number of family members and their training months. Please note that the member's subscription will begin at the time of registration. You may replace one family member with another if necessary.

Enter the desired number of students and their training months. Please note that the student's subscription will begin at the time of registration. You may replace one student for another if necessary.

Enter the desired number of participants and their training months. Please note that the participant's subscription will begin at the time of registration. You may replace one participant for another if necessary.

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CogniFit: Leaders in Brain Training for Depression in Adults

CogniFit: Leaders in Brain Training for Depression in Adults

  • Access online activities and exercises for adults with depression
  • Helps strengthen cognitive skills impaired in adults with depression
  • Get a complete results, progress and evolution report

Depression is a mood disorder that can be very disabling and should not be confused with sadness or unhappiness. While sadness, unhappiness, anger, frustration, grief, suicidal thoughts, or apathy are common symptoms of depression, it also includes cognitive symptoms. CogniFit has therefore designed an online cognitive training to help improve cognitive abilities and reduce cognitive depression symptoms.

People with depression have distinctive features in their brain, both structurally and functionally. The part of the brain known as the "amygdala," which is closely related to emotions, displays impaired activity in people with depression. On the other hand, people with depression show a weaker state of executive functions. CogniFit training for people with depression stimulates cognitive abilities to promote small changes in the brain that help reduce depressive symptoms.

CogniFit training can be done from either a computer, tablet or smartphone with an internet connection. The main goal is to reduce the depression symptoms related to cognitive impairment. Thus, cognitive training can be effective in improving the daily life of people suffering from depression, enhancing the performance at work, at school or at home.

Several independent scientific institutions have tried CogniFit training activities through highly rigorous research. One of the most prominent features of the CogniFit training for depression is its ability to adapt to the specific cognitive needs of the user, personalizing the training plan. CogniFit is a multi-dimensional scientific tool that trains the main cognitive abilities most related to depression through a variety of games and assessment tasks.

Note: CogniFit does not treat depression itself, but may help improve cognitive skills affected by this disorder.

Excellent!

You're above average.

Memory

Perception

Attention

Coordination

Reasoning

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Low
Average
High
Very high

Who is it for?

Who is it for?

Depression is a mood disorder that can be very incapacitating, affecting people of all ages and genders. In order to try to help as many people as possible, CogniFit is available in different platforms to suit every type of user:

People with depression who want to reduce their symptoms

Train my cognitive abilities related to depression

You can use CogniFit if you are depressed and want extra support apart from the therapy you receive on your own or if you simply want to improve your cognitive abilities affected by this mood disorder. This training will be adjusted to your specific cognitive needs and will automatically offer you a series of activities adapted to your level.
Family members or caregivers

Strengthening my relative's cognitive abilities related to depression

The emotional state of depressed people can make it difficult to manage their cognitive training. For this reason, you will be able to manage their depression training from the CogniFit family platform. It can also be especially useful when our family member is not acquainted with the use of technology.
Health Professionals

To help the cognitive skills of my adult patients with depression

Combining CogniFit with classic therapy for depression and bipolar disorder may help improve outcomes and reduce depressive symptoms. As health professionals, we may be interested in applying CogniFit in our therapy to promote cognitive health in our patients. To this end, CogniFit has created the platform for health professionals, which, in addition to providing treatment support during therapy, gives them the option of further cognitive training from their own homes (cognitive remote stimulation).

Researchers and scientists

Study the effects of cognitive training in adults with depression

CogniFit's platform for researchers helps the process of collecting, managing, and comparing cognitive data within the scientific study. In addition, researchers will have a "control" cognitive training group. Unlike other groups, control group participants will perform different tasks at the lowest level of difficulty, which allows control of certain variables and more consistent research.

Trained cognitive skills

Trained cognitive skills

Some of the most typical symptoms of depression have a neuropsychological basis. People with depression show difficulties related to certain cognitive abilities. CogniFit training for depression focuses on these alterations to strengthen cognitive abilities and help improve depression symptoms:

Cognitive Domains Trained
Cognitive Skills

Memory

The ability to retain or use new information and recover memories of the past. Memory allows us to store internal representations of knowledge in our brain and retain events from the past to use them in the future. Learning is a key process in memory because it makes it possible to incorporate new information or modify existing information in the previous mental schemas. After this coding and storage, the information, the memory, or the learning should be made available to be recovered in the future. The hippocampus is a key brain structure in the mnesic process and works actively during sleep to consolidate the information acquired during the day.

Excellent8.1%

689Your Score

400Average

Working Memory

Working Memory

A set of processes that allow us to store and temporarily manipulate information to perform complex cognitive tasks such as language comprehension, reading, mathematical skills, learning, or reasoning. People suffering from depression find it more difficult to manipulate the information they retain in their short-term memory.

675Your Score

400Average

Reasoning

Ability to efficiently use (order, relate, etc.) the information acquired through the different senses. Through executive functions, we can access and use the information acquired in order to achieve complex goals. This set of superior processes makes it possible for us to relate, classify, order and plan our ideas or actions according to the needs that are imposed in the present or future. They allow us to be flexible and adapt to the environment. The executive functions make it possible to be effective in our day to day lives, solve problems and achieve our objectives even if there are modifications in the original plan.

Good2.8%

412Your Score

400Average

Shifting

Shifting

The ability to adapt our behavior and thinking to new, changing or unexpected situations. When a person suffers from depression, changing certain habits or modifying certain behaviors and thoughts can be a real challenge.

372Your Score

400Average

Attention

Ability to filter distractions and focus on relevant information. Attention accompanies every cognitive process and is in charge of assigning cognitive resources depending on the relevance of both internal and external stimuli. Good attention skills are necessary for other high-level processes, like memory or planning. Attention is an essential process that requires the use of different parts of the brain, from the brainstem or the parietal cortex, to the prefrontal cortex. However, it seems that the right hemisphere has a predominant role in controlling attention. This cognitive area makes it possible to stay alert and pay attention to the stimuli when other irrelevant distractors are present, concentration for long periods of time, alternating attention between different activities, or dividing attention when two events are happening at the same time.

Excellent7.1%

459Your Score

400Average

Divided Attention

Divided Attention

The ability of our brain to attend to different stimuli or tasks at the same time, and thus respond to the multiple demands of the environment. Divided attention is a type of simultaneous attention that allows us to process different sources of information and successfully execute more than one task at a time. People suffering from depression often have greater difficulty in properly managing cognitive resources that involve performing more than one activity simultaneously.

500Your Score

400Average

Inhibition

Inhibition

The ability to inhibit or control impulsive (or automatic) responses, and generate responses mediated by attention and reasoning. People with a depression disorder tend to have a weaker inhibitory response than people without mood disorders.

422Your Score

400Average

Updating

Updating

The ability to adapt our behavior and thinking to new, changing or unexpected situations. When a person suffers from depression, changing certain habits or modifying certain behaviors and thoughts can be a real challenge.

392Your Score

400Average

What will I get from CogniFit brain training for depression?

What will I get from CogniFit brain training for depression?

The main goal of the depression program is to improve the overall quality of life for people with this disorder. To this end, CogniFit offers cognitive training that, combined with regular therapy, helps to reduce depression symptoms. It intends:

  • Depressed people's brain activity has been shown to be different from that of people without mood disorders. Therefore, by applying appropriate cognitive stimulation, CogniFit aims to favorably alter certain brain connections related to depression.
  • CogniFit can help reduce the symptoms of depression when applied in addition to regular therapy. Aside from improving symptoms, it also enhances the state of some altered cognitive abilities in depression.
  • Being in a poor mood can hinder basic daily activities, such as studying, going to class, going to work or even getting out of bed. CogniFit's training for depression aims to reduce these symptoms in order to improve these daily activities.
  • Depression tends to impair the quality and quantity of our personal relationships. Therefore, reducing symptoms is expected to improve family and social relationships.

How does it strengthen cognitive function?

How does it strengthen cognitive function?

CogniFit training for depression features a number of activities that require effort for our brain. When this effort is made, our brain stimulates certain neural connections and, if done properly, can cause small changes in the brain at a structural and functional level.

The mechanism by which our brain is able to modify its connections as a consequence of cognitive stimulation is known as " brain plasticity ". Brain plasticity allows our brain to adapt to the demands of the environment. This is why it is important that the training is personalized and generates the type of effort appropriate for people with a depression disorder.

The changes produced by cognitive training in the brain can help reduce the symptoms of depression, strengthen weaker cognitive abilities and improve the daily lives of people with this disorder.

1st WEEK

2nd WEEK

3rd WEEK

Graphic projection of neural networks after 3 weeks.

Benefits

Benefits

CogniFit has spent many years researching and studying how to provide the best cognitive training for people suffering from depression. This effort can be reflected in all the advantages it offers over other online cognitive stimulation programs:

Easy to use

One of CogniFit's goals is to make training as accessible as possible, so the training process has been made as simple as possible. The training for depression has automated processes that gather user information, decide the best training plan and adapt the different variables to improve the user's experience.

Highly attractive

CogniFit's design of the depression training activities and format are intended to be motivating and appealing to different types of users in a way that makes adherence to cognitive stimulation easier.

Interactive and visual format

Clear instructions and dynamic activities are essential to make it easier for people with depression to complete and maintain cognitive training. This is why the instructions and the activities themselves are presented in an interactive format.

Complete results report

Knowing that we are improving can be very motivating, so CogniFit provides quick and accurate feedback on the results of the training session. It informs us how our cognitive skills have changed since the last training session.

Progress and evolution

CogniFit allows us to access all our cognitive data so that we can check at any time our evolution, how much we have progressed since the last sessions and what are our strengths and weaknesses.

Adapted to each user

CogniFit uses all the information gathered during the cognitive training for depression to personalize the training plan to our specific needs. This way, we will always train the cognitive skills that need to be strengthened at the highest level of difficulty for each user.

Tele-stimulation

CogniFit training for depression is available on different devices (computer, tablet, and smartphone) with an internet connection. This allows us to access depression training at any time and anywhere.

What happens if you don't train your cognitive skills?

What happens if you don't train your cognitive skills?

Symptoms of depression are sometimes very noticeable. However, other problems derived from depression are not as well known, as with cognitive alterations. People with depression often show impairments in executive functions, which are essential to organizing, controlling and self-regulating their behavior.

However, cognitive training designed to improve the cognitive alterations of depression, such as CogniFit, works on executive functions and other relevant cognitive abilities. In addition, CogniFit training for depression may help improve the cognitive skills and symptoms of people with depression or bipolar disorder. This multi-dimensional and systematic training helps activate altered brain patterns in depression.

Memory

Perception

Attention

Coordination

Reasoning

How much time should I spend with CogniFit?

S M T W T F S

How much time should I spend with CogniFit?

CogniFit training sessions typically last between 15 and 20 minutes. The time we need to devote to CogniFit depression training may vary from person to person, but a minimum of one session a day, three days a week, is recommended. In any case, we can increase or decrease the frequency and intensity of training.

A training session for depression is always structured around three activities: two games for cognitive stimulation and an evaluation task. Thus, it is possible to stimulate and automatically monitor the user's progress.

CogniFit is unique

CogniFit is unique

Multidisciplinary Exercises

Complete results report

Automatic task selection

Leading Instrument

Dynamic Difficulty Adjustment

Customized for each user

Scientifically validated

CogniFit's standardized, multi-dimensional activities allow us to stimulate our cognitive abilities related to depression. These features make CogniFit the leading online cognitive stimulation instrument for depression.

CogniFit's patented ITS™ (Individualized Training System) technology automatically personalizes the difficulty and type of exercises that will be presented to the user during depression training. This patented technology has been designed by an international team of scientists, neurologists, and psychologists, who research the latest discoveries and advances in the brain.

Each person's circumstances are different, as are the cognitive alterations we may suffer from depression. Training that doesn't meet our needs can end up being an obstacle to treatment. To avoid these problems, CogniFit offers personalized training thanks to ITS technology, offering a challenge designed to strengthen our cognitive weaknesses.

In any case, it is not enough to adjust the activities correctly at the beginning of the training, but it is necessary that the training also adapts to our progress. To do this, CogniFit software collects, stores and processes hundreds of variables during the training session, to adapt to each user's needs and to show a complete report on their activity and evolution.

It is important to note that not all online cognitive stimulation activities are the same.

Customer Service

Customer Service

If you have any questions about CogniFit Brain Training for depression including data performance, management or interpretation, you can contact us immediately. Our team of professionals will answer your questions and help you with everything you need.

Contact Us Now

References

References

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  • Penninx, B., Milaneschi, Y., Lamers, F., Vogelzangs, N. Understanding the somatic consequences of depression: biological mechanisms and the role of depression symptom profile. BMC Medicine. 2013 May 11(129):1-14.
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  • Netler, E. J., Barrot, M., DiLeone, R. J., Eisch, A. J., Gold, S. G., Monteggia, L. M. Neurobiology of Depression. Neuron. 2002 Mar 34(1):13-25.
  • Brintzenhofe-Szoc, K. M., Levin, T. T., Li, Y., Kissane, D. W., Zabora, J. R. Mixed Anxiety/Depression Symptoms in a Large Cancer Cohort: Prevalence by Cancer Type. Psychosomatics. 2009 Jul 50(4):383-391.
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  • Agid, O., Shapira, B., Zislin, J., Ritsner, M., Hanin, B., Murad, H., Troudart, T., Bloch, M., Heresco-Levy, U., Lerer, B. Environment and vulnerability to major psychiatric illness: a case control study of early parental loss in major depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Molecular psychiatry. 1999, 4:163-172.
  • Nolen-Hoeksema, S. Gender Differences in Depression. SAGE journals. 2001 Oct 10(5): 173-176.
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  • Martínez-Arán, A., Vieta, Eduard, Reinares, M., Colom, F., Torrent, C., Sánchez-Moreno, J., Benabarre, A., Goikolea, J. M., Comes, M., Salamero, M. Cognitive Function Across Manic or Hypomanic, Depressed, and Euthymic States in Bipolar Disorder. The American Journal of Psychiatry. 2004 Feb 161(2):262-270.
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